We are a safe haven in Dutchess County NY for canines, specializing in retired search and rescue bloodhounds.
Our goal is to transition retired search and rescue bloodhounds into a family environment to enjoy their retirement. Additionally, we will be rescuing canines from various shelters and providing them with training in the areas of tracking, search and rescue and therapy.
We are a 501c3/non-profit organization.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
animalwelfarists:

(via Pets House)
Alcohol - the ethanol can cause rapid damage to your dogs respiratory and central nervous system. Intoxication, coma, and death are risks associated with the consumption of alcohol.
Garlic - the sulfoxides and disulfides can damage red blood cells which may lead to anemia.
Sugar - poses the long term risks of obesity, dental issues, and diabetes mellitus.
Onion - like garlic, the sulfoxides and disulfides can damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Onion is more toxic for dogs than garlic.
Mushroom - may contain toxins which can affect numerous systems in the body, resulting in shock and eventual death.
Chocolate - the theobromida in chocolate is damaging to the cardiorespiratory system, nervous system, and kidneys. Consumption can result in diarrhea and vomiting.
Fruit Pits - poses a risk of gastrointestinal obstruction.
Grapes + Raisins - it’s unknown why these are so dangerous but they pose a serious risk of kidney damage.
Yeast Dough - like alcohol, the ethanol is toxic to dogs and may cause much of the same affects. Unlike alcohol, yeast dough also poses the risk of expanding and creating gas in the GI tract.
There’s a lot more “people foods” dangerous to dogs, before you give your pup something make sure it’s not dangerous to them. Your dog’s life is worth the couple minute search on google!

Keep this in mind if your dog is going to be at any barbecues with you! Even if you know what not to feed your dog, other people may not so keep an eye on them the entire time, and don’t let them eat anything off the ground

animalwelfarists:

(via Pets House)

Alcohol - the ethanol can cause rapid damage to your dogs respiratory and central nervous system. Intoxication, coma, and death are risks associated with the consumption of alcohol.

Garlic - the sulfoxides and disulfides can damage red blood cells which may lead to anemia.

Sugar - poses the long term risks of obesity, dental issues, and diabetes mellitus.

Onion - like garlic, the sulfoxides and disulfides can damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Onion is more toxic for dogs than garlic.

Mushroom - may contain toxins which can affect numerous systems in the body, resulting in shock and eventual death.

Chocolate - the theobromida in chocolate is damaging to the cardiorespiratory system, nervous system, and kidneys. Consumption can result in diarrhea and vomiting.

Fruit Pits - poses a risk of gastrointestinal obstruction.

Grapes + Raisins - it’s unknown why these are so dangerous but they pose a serious risk of kidney damage.

Yeast Dough - like alcohol, the ethanol is toxic to dogs and may cause much of the same affects. Unlike alcohol, yeast dough also poses the risk of expanding and creating gas in the GI tract.

There’s a lot more “people foods” dangerous to dogs, before you give your pup something make sure it’s not dangerous to them. Your dog’s life is worth the couple minute search on google!

Keep this in mind if your dog is going to be at any barbecues with you! Even if you know what not to feed your dog, other people may not so keep an eye on them the entire time, and don’t let them eat anything off the ground

Keep your pets safe this 4th of July weekend!
Don’t bring them to see fireworks with your family
Keep them in a quiet room with the shades down
Turn on the radio or air conditioning as white noise
Make sure they have tags with your address and phone number
Make sure they are microchipped
And if your pets are going to any barbecues with you, be sure to keep them away from poisonous or harmful foods that they could get fed or eat off the ground. That includes onions, tomatoes, chocolate, cooked bones of any kind, and beer/alcohol

Keep your pets safe this 4th of July weekend!

  • Don’t bring them to see fireworks with your family
  • Keep them in a quiet room with the shades down
  • Turn on the radio or air conditioning as white noise
  • Make sure they have tags with your address and phone number
  • Make sure they are microchipped

And if your pets are going to any barbecues with you, be sure to keep them away from poisonous or harmful foods that they could get fed or eat off the ground. That includes onions, tomatoes, chocolate, cooked bones of any kind, and beer/alcohol

This is a courtesy post (you can contact us if you are interested and we will contact her owners)

5 year old female bloodhound spayed and UTD with all shots. Ellie is an inside/ outside (on nice days) dog. She is fully house trained, crate trained and excellent with Children. She lives in our home with an 8 year old and a 9 month old. Unfortunately due to finding out our 9 month old has allergies to animal fur we are forced to place Ellie up for adoption . We have had Ellie since she was 6 weeks old. She loves to snuggle and take long naps daily. She did sleep in our bed until she became a bed hog  she is about 85 lbs, red color with big floppy ears!! More pictures upon request


Reblogged from animalwelfarists  4,579 notes

canisantiquus:

Don’t take your dog out in the afternoon heat during summer!
    Not unless you’re going to the river or beach, or a nice cool shady spot. Humans are very efficient at staying cool, using our whole bodies as radiators. Dogs not so much. Their coats will protect them from sunburn, but not sunstroke!

Ways to avoid heat stress in the summer:

  • Wear a light jacket when you walk your dog- this will allow you to better judge when enough is enough by feeling the heat yourself.
  • Walk before lunch or after dinner, when the sun is not its strongest.
  • Set up a kids pool or sprinkler so your dog can wade and chase the water.
  • Wrap a wet bandanna around your dog’s neck
  • Buy a light heat-reflecting vest for black dogs
  • Shave your dog’s underside so it can passively shed heat.
  • Have your dog’s undercoat removed - this is usually an arduous and tedious task, so you may want to pay a groomer to do it.
  • Freeze plain yogurt or broth for a cooling treat

Be especially wary of heat stroke for short-faced, cobby, and heavy-coated dogs!

Symptoms include: 
rapid abdominal contraction, excessive panting, flushed tongue, thick saliva, high heartrate, unsettledness, high internal temperature.

      If your dog shows signs of heat stroke, cool them down immediately by wetting them, giving water, fanning, making sure the air and water penetrates their coat.

     Even if a dog shows no signs of damage, heat stroke can cause internal/organ damage, so have a checkup with a vet.

abitoffluffiness:

This is a big pet peeve for Jeremy and I. We ALWAYS have our boys on leashes and cannot believe how many loose dogs we encounter in our neighborhood.
The boys are relatively friendly with other dogs, but when I have all three of them leashed up and a new dog comes bounding towards us and gets all up in our business, chaos ensues. They get wrapped around my legs, tangled up in their leashes and it stresses them out.
Then when Jeremy goes running with MoJo, he frequently encounters people sitting on their porches with their dogs hanging out off leash that end up chasing MoJo down. Jeremy has had to pick MoJo up a few times just to get the other dog to go away!
Restrain your dogs, people. Even if they are “friendly.”

abitoffluffiness:

This is a big pet peeve for Jeremy and I. We ALWAYS have our boys on leashes and cannot believe how many loose dogs we encounter in our neighborhood.

The boys are relatively friendly with other dogs, but when I have all three of them leashed up and a new dog comes bounding towards us and gets all up in our business, chaos ensues. They get wrapped around my legs, tangled up in their leashes and it stresses them out.

Then when Jeremy goes running with MoJo, he frequently encounters people sitting on their porches with their dogs hanging out off leash that end up chasing MoJo down. Jeremy has had to pick MoJo up a few times just to get the other dog to go away!

Restrain your dogs, people. Even if they are “friendly.”